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Episode 106 – Simone De Beauvoir pt. 2 – The Ethics of Ambiguity

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Simone De Beauvoir (1908–1986)


On this episode, we take a look at Simone De Beauvoir and her book The Ethics of Ambiguity. See the full transcript of this episode here.

There are some thinkers who are, from the very beginning, unambiguously identified as philosophers (e.g., Plato). There are others whose philosophical place is forever contested (e.g., Nietzsche); and there are those who have gradually won the right to be admitted into the philosophical fold. Simone de Beauvoir is one of these belatedly acknowledged philosophers. Identifying herself as an author rather than as a philosopher and calling herself the midwife of Sartre’s existential ethics rather than a thinker in her own right, Beauvoir’s place in philosophy had to be won against her word.

Continue reading Episode 106 – Simone De Beauvoir pt. 2 – The Ethics of Ambiguity

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Episode #105 – Sartre and Camus pt. 6 – The Self

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Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980)


On this episode, we look at Sartre and his views on the Self. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Sartre (1905–1980) is arguably the best known philosopher of the twentieth century. His indefatigable pursuit of philosophical reflection, literary creativity and, in the second half of his life, active political commitment gained him worldwide renown, if not admiration. He is commonly considered the father of Existentialist philosophy, whose writings set the tone for intellectual life in the decade immediately following the Second World War. Among the many ironies that permeate his life, not the least is the immense popularity of his scandalous public lecture “Existentialism is a Humanism,” delivered to an enthusiastic Parisian crowd October 28, 1945.

Continue reading Episode #105 – Sartre and Camus pt. 6 – The Self

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Episode 104 – Sartre and Camus pt. 5 – Consciousness is Freedom

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Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980)


On this episode, we look at Sartre and his famous statement, “Consciousness is Freedom”. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Sartre (1905–1980) is arguably the best known philosopher of the twentieth century. His indefatigable pursuit of philosophical reflection, literary creativity and, in the second half of his life, active political commitment gained him worldwide renown, if not admiration. He is commonly considered the father of Existentialist philosophy, whose writings set the tone for intellectual life in the decade immediately following the Second World War. Among the many ironies that permeate his life, not the least is the immense popularity of his scandalous public lecture “Existentialism is a Humanism,” delivered to an enthusiastic Parisian crowd October 28, 1945.

Continue reading Episode 104 – Sartre and Camus pt. 5 – Consciousness is Freedom

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Episode 103 – Sartre and Camus pt. 4 – The Quest For Certainty

sartreycamus1

Jean-Paul Sartre (1905–1980)


On this episode, we take a look at a story from the history of philosophy preparing us to understand the Phenomenology of Sartre. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Sartre (1905–1980) is arguably the best known philosopher of the twentieth century. His indefatigable pursuit of philosophical reflection, literary creativity and, in the second half of his life, active political commitment gained him worldwide renown, if not admiration. He is commonly considered the father of Existentialist philosophy, whose writings set the tone for intellectual life in the decade immediately following the Second World War. Among the many ironies that permeate his life, not the least is the immense popularity of his scandalous public lecture “Existentialism is a Humanism,” delivered to an enthusiastic Parisian crowd October 28, 1945.

Continue reading Episode 103 – Sartre and Camus pt. 4 – The Quest For Certainty

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Episode 102 – Heidegger pt. 3 – Authenticity

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Martin Heidegger (1889-1976)


On this episode, we take a look at Martin Heidegger and his concept of Authenticity. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Martin Heidegger was born in Messkirch, Germany, on September 26, 1889. Messkirch was then a quiet, conservative, religious rural town, and as such was a formative influence on Heidegger and his philosophical thought. In 1909 he spent two weeks in the Jesuit order before leaving (probably on health grounds) to study theology at the University of Freiburg. In 1911 he switched subjects, to philosophy. He began teaching at Freiburg in 1915. In 1917 he married Elfride Petri, with whom he had two sons (Jörg and Hermann) and from whom he never parted (although his affair with the philosopher Hannah Arendt, his student at Marburg in the 1920s, is well-known). (source)

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Episode 101 – Heidegger pt. 2 – Science and Technology

Heidegger_1955

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976)


On this episode, we take a look at Martin Heidegger and his views on modern technology and the history of science and philosophy. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Martin Heidegger was born in Messkirch, Germany, on September 26, 1889. Messkirch was then a quiet, conservative, religious rural town, and as such was a formative influence on Heidegger and his philosophical thought. In 1909 he spent two weeks in the Jesuit order before leaving (probably on health grounds) to study theology at the University of Freiburg. In 1911 he switched subjects, to philosophy. He began teaching at Freiburg in 1915. In 1917 he married Elfride Petri, with whom he had two sons (Jörg and Hermann) and from whom he never parted (although his affair with the philosopher Hannah Arendt, his student at Marburg in the 1920s, is well-known). (source)

Continue reading Episode 101 – Heidegger pt. 2 – Science and Technology

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Episode 100 – Heidegger pt. 1 – Phenomenology and Dasein

Heidegger_1955

Martin Heidegger (1889-1976)


On this episode, we take a look at Martin Heidegger and his concept of Dasein. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Martin Heidegger was born in Messkirch, Germany, on September 26, 1889. Messkirch was then a quiet, conservative, religious rural town, and as such was a formative influence on Heidegger and his philosophical thought. In 1909 he spent two weeks in the Jesuit order before leaving (probably on health grounds) to study theology at the University of Freiburg. In 1911 he switched subjects, to philosophy. He began teaching at Freiburg in 1915. In 1917 he married Elfride Petri, with whom he had two sons (Jörg and Hermann) and from whom he never parted (although his affair with the philosopher Hannah Arendt, his student at Marburg in the 1920s, is well-known). (source)

Continue reading Episode 100 – Heidegger pt. 1 – Phenomenology and Dasein

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Episode 99 – Schopenhauer pt. 2 – Ethics


Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)


On this episode, we take a look at the ethics of Arthur Schopenhauer. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Among 19th century philosophers, Arthur Schopenhauer was among the first to contend that at its core, the universe is not a rational place. Inspired by Plato and Kant, both of whom regarded the world as being more amenable to reason, Schopenhauer developed their philosophies into an instinct-recognizing and ultimately ascetic outlook, emphasizing that in the face of a world filled with endless strife, we ought to minimize our natural desires for the sake of achieving a more tranquil frame of mind and a disposition towards universal beneficence. Continue reading Episode 99 – Schopenhauer pt. 2 – Ethics

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Episode 98 – Schopenhauer pt. 1 – Metaphysics and Love

Schopenhauer

Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860)


On this episode, we take a look at the the metaphysics of Arthur Schopenhauer and touch briefly on his views on love. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Among 19th century philosophers, Arthur Schopenhauer was among the first to contend that at its core, the universe is not a rational place. Inspired by Plato and Kant, both of whom regarded the world as being more amenable to reason, Schopenhauer developed their philosophies into an instinct-recognizing and ultimately ascetic outlook, emphasizing that in the face of a world filled with endless strife, we ought to minimize our natural desires for the sake of achieving a more tranquil frame of mind and a disposition towards universal beneficence. Continue reading Episode 98 – Schopenhauer pt. 1 – Metaphysics and Love

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Episode 97 – Wittgenstein pt. 1

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Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951)


On this episode, we take a look at the the limitations of language as described by Ludwig Wittgenstein. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Considered by some to be the greatest philosopher of the 20th century, Ludwig Wittgenstein played a central, if controversial, role in 20th-century analytic philosophy. He continues to influence current philosophical thought in topics as diverse as logic and language, perception and intention, ethics and religion, aesthetics and culture. Originally, there were two commonly recognized stages of Wittgenstein’s thought—the early and the later—both of which were taken to be pivotal in their respective periods. In more recent scholarship, this division has been questioned: some interpreters have claimed a unity between all stages of his thought, while others talk of a more nuanced division, adding stages such as the middle Wittgenstein and the third Wittgenstein. Continue reading Episode 97 – Wittgenstein pt. 1