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Episode 88 – Sartre and Camus pt. 3

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The Great Debate


On this episode, we take a look at the great post WW2 debate between Sartre and Camus. See the full transcript of this episode here.

Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus first met in June 1943, at the opening of Sartre’s play The Flies. When Sartre was standing in the lobby, according to Simone de Beauvoir, “a dark-skinned young man came up and introduced himself: it was Albert Camus.” His novel The Stranger, published a year earlier, was a literary sensation, and his philosophical essay The Myth of Sisyphus had appeared six months previously. The young man from Algiers was marooned in France by the war.

While convalescing from an exacerbation of his chronic tuberculosis in Le Panelier, near Chambon, Camus had been cut off from his wife by the Allied conquest of French North Africa and the resulting German invasion of unoccupied France in November 1942. He wanted to meet the increasingly well-known novelist and philosopher—and now playwright—whose fiction he had reviewed years earlier and who had just published a long article on Camus’s own books. It was a brief encounter. “I’m Camus,” he said. Sartre immediately “found him a most likeable personality.” (source)


Further Reading on Sartre:

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Recommended Reading


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